Temperatures reported as reaching an unimaginable 48 degrees Celsius

Temperatures reported as reaching an unimaginable 48 degrees Celsius

If accurate this should be major headlines across the world.

Meanwhile…

Death Valley was the hottest place on Earth on Sunday with an all-time high temperature of 130 degrees, reported over 100 years ago, was also recorded in Death Valley.

Even I am having a hard time absorbing this shocking information

Ground Temperatures Hit 118 Degrees (48 degrees Celsius) in the Arctic Circle

The ongoing climate crisis is not going to spare Siberia.

 

Newly published satellite imager

Ground temperatures across Siberia have reached record highs during the region’s heatwave.
Ground temperatures across Siberia have reached record highs during the region’s heatwave.
Image: European Union, Copernicus Sentinel-3 imagery

 

Gizmodo,

22 June, 2021

 

Newly published satellite imagery shows the ground temperature in at least one location in Siberia topped 118 degrees Fahrenheit (48 degrees Celsius) going into the year’s longest day. It’s hot Siberia Earth summer, and it certainly won’t be the last..

While many heads swiveled to the American West as cities like Phoenix and Salt Lake City suffered shockingly hot temperatures this past week, a similar climatological aberrance unfolded on the opposite side of the world in the Arctic Circle. That’s not bizarre when you consider that the planet heating up is a global affair, one that isn’t picky about its targets. We’re all the target!

The 118-degree-Fahrenheit temperature was measured on the ground in Verkhojansk, in Yakutia, Eastern Siberia, by the European Space Agency’s Copernicus Sentinel satellites. Other ground temperatures in the region included 109 degrees Fahrenheit (43 degrees Celsius) in Govorovo and 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit (37 degrees Celsius) in Saskylah, which had its highest temperatures since 1936. It’s important to note that the temperatures being discussed here are land surface temperatures, not air temperatures. The air temperature in Verkhojansk was 86 degrees Fahrenheit (30 degrees Celsius)—still anomalously hot, but not Arizona hot.

Melting Alaskan permafrost in 2019.
Melting Alaskan permafrost in 2019.
Photo: MARK RALSTON/AFP (Getty Images)

But the ground temperature being so warm is still very bad. Those temperatures beleaguer the permafrost—the frozen soil of yore, which holds in greenhouse gases and on which much of eastern Russia is built. As permafrost thaws, it sighs its methane back into the atmosphere, causing chasms in the Earth.

Besides the deleterious effects of more greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, the permafrost melting destabilizes the Siberian earth, unsettling building foundations and causing landslides. It also exposes the frozen carcasses of many Ice Age mammals, meaning paleontologists have to work fast to study the species that thrived when the planet was much colder. For all the talk of reanimating the woolly mammoth, one’s got to remember: the place they knew is long gone.

The same region also suffered through a heat wave that led to a very un-Siberian air temperature reading of 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius) exactly a year ago to the day from the new freak heat. It’s the hottest temperature ever recorded in the region. It was also in the 90s last month in western Siberia, reflecting that the sweltering new abnormal is affecting just about everywhere. And it’s not just the permafrost suffering; wildfires last year in Siberia pumped a record amount of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, ensuring more summers like this are to come.

This is the weather forecast according to Google

100 degrees Fahrenheit! Eastern Siberian town shatters record for hottest-ever temperature inside Arctic Circle

100 degrees Fahrenheit! Eastern Siberian town shatters record for hottest-ever temperature inside Arctic Circle

This is where Verkhoyansk is

You can read an article about Verkhoyansk HERE

Here are the “normal’ temperatures:

This was reported at the end of January.

These fires are in Tamponsky Region, which is adjacent to the Verkhoyanksky region.

Fires in pear that were reported as 10 times as bad as the year before never went out but continued to burn under the snow.

Peat fires continue to burn at air temperature of -50C in northeastern Yakutia

By The Siberian Times reporter
27 January 2021

Pillars of smoke filmed over the areas hit by last summer’s wildfires despite the current long spell of extremely cold weather.

Zombie fires in northeastern Yakutia, Russia’s largest and coldest inhabited region. Picture: The Siberian Times

The latest sighting of winter – zombie – fires was recorded on 23 January by the village of Saydy in the Tomponsky district of Yakutia, some 400km north-east of the republic’s capital Yakutsk. 

Local man Ivan Zakharov who filmed the fire at -50C told The Siberian Times: ‘It is burning near the area hit by last summer’s wildfires.

 

 

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