World War Showdown: NATO Warships to Challenge Black Sea Blockade

World War Showdown: NATO Warships to Challenge Black Sea Blockade

The ruling elite in the United States are in a lose-lose situation: go to a war which they cannot win or back down and that will mark the end of the United States as a super-power.

What happens if countries like France or Germany which have plenty of reason NOT to fight a war ‘walk’, leaving the USA and UK on their own?

This and more discussed in this not-to-be-missed newscast.

Today on TRUNEWS, host Edward Szall discusses the face-off with Russia by NATO, as the head of the US Strategic Command tweets that nuclear war is an option. Meanwhile, UK and US warships plan to attempt to re-enter the Black Sea and test the resolve of Vladimir Putin.

Edward Szall, Rick Wiles, Doc Burkhart. Airdate (04/20/21)

US must prepare for nuclear war: Strategic Command warns today’s unpredictable conflicts could escalate ‘rapidly’ where countries consider nuclear use as ‘their least bad option’

  • US Strategic Command is giving testimony to Congress in its posture review
  • In a preview, the command said conflict today is ‘neither linear nor predictable’
  • US Space Command will also give evidence about the state of its force
  • General James Dickinson said China and Russia are preparing space weapons

 

Daily Mail,

20 April, 2021

 

US Strategic Command will warn in its annual posture statement that the ‘spectrum of conflict today’ could rapidly lead to nuclear war.

Commander Charles Richard will give testimony to the House Armed Services Committee and the Senate Committee on Armed Services this week.

The posture review informs Congress on the state of Strategic Command and what it intends to do with its 2022 budget request.

US Strategic Command will warn in its annual posture statement that the 'spectrum of conflict today' could rapidly lead to nuclear war

US Strategic Command will warn in its annual posture statement that the ‘spectrum of conflict today’ could rapidly lead to nuclear war

It also determines the command’s readiness for combat, its strategic vision and likely causes of conflict in the near future. 

Strategic Command said in a preview of their statement on Monday: ‘The spectrum of conflict today is neither linear nor predictable. 

‘We must account for the possibility of conflict leading to conditions which could very rapidly drive an adversary to consider nuclear use as their least bad option.’

The testimony will be heard on Tuesday and Wednesday and will be delivered by Commander Richard alongside US Space Command’s Commander James Dickinson.

Ahead of the review, he said his force has the difficult position of trying to prepare for a war that has never been fought before.

Commander Charles Richard will give testimony to the House Armed Services Committee and the Senate Committee on Armed Services this week

The army general told The Hill: ‘United States Space Command faces a unique dilemma in that we can’t plan for future conflicts based on how we fought previous conflicts even if we were inclined to do so. Rather, we are preparing for the war not yet fought. 

‘Why do we need to prepare for such a conflict when space has traditionally been a peaceful domain, open to all for exploration, and whose benefits improve the lives of virtually every human being on Earth? 

‘As I will soon testify to Congress, the answer is because highly capable competitors realize the extraordinary military and economic advantages that space-based capabilities give to the United States and our allies.’

The testimony will be heard on Tuesday and Wednesday and will be delivered by Commander Richard alongside US Space Command’s Commander James Dickinson (pictured)

Commander Dickinson noted that China is rapidly building military space capabilities including anti-satellite weapons while Russia has already conducted a number of space missile tests.

Such threats could harm US communication systems and the West’s ‘extraordinary reliance’ on space for modern technology. 

The military review comes at a time of fraught relations with Russia amid major military exercises in the Black Sea that prompted Joe Biden to send two battleships to the region.

Vladimir Putin has deployed more than 100,000 troops along the Ukrainian border and in the Crimea where a new military camp was revealed by satellite imagery on Monday. 

Satellite images of an area next to Kachyk Lake in Crimea have revealed a new Russian military camp (right) and sub-camp (left) which have been constructed between March 15 and April 13 amid a wider troop build-up on the Ukraine border

Satellite images of an area next to Kachyk Lake in Crimea have revealed a new Russian military camp (right) and sub-camp (left) which have been constructed between March 15 and April 13 amid a wider troop build-up on the Ukraine border

A Ukrainian solider inside a machine gun turret of a light vehicle near the Ukrainian Azov Sea port of Mariupol on Monday. It is feared the Russian blockade could prevent access to Ukrainian ports in the Sea of Azov, which is connected to the Black Sea through the Kerch Strait, on the eastern tip of the Crimean peninsula annexed by Russia in 2014

A Ukrainian solider inside a machine gun turret of a light vehicle near the Ukrainian Azov Sea port of Mariupol on Monday. It is feared the Russian blockade could prevent access to Ukrainian ports in the Sea of Azov, which is connected to the Black Sea through the Kerch Strait, on the eastern tip of the Crimean peninsula annexed by Russia in 2014

Ukrainian tanks are lined up outside the port of Mariupol on Monday. Russian state media have reported that Moscow intends to close parts of the Black Sea to foreign military and official ships for six months

Ukrainian tanks are lined up outside the port of Mariupol on Monday. Russian state media have reported that Moscow intends to close parts of the Black Sea to foreign military and official ships for six months

Increased Russian military activity around Crimea and Ukraine border

Moscow’s military says it is conducting exercises along the frontier in response to moves by Western military alliance NATO that ‘threaten Russia’. 

Ukraine is pushing the West for more practical support as it looks to deter any further aggression from Moscow in a conflict that is already fraying US-Russian relations. 

Biden has called for the Russian president to ‘de-escalate’ tensions and proposed a summit which could take place in Finland in the coming months.

The move has been hailed as a win by Moscow, after Biden previously took a hard line against Putin – calling him ‘a killer’ and refusing to meet with him on the basis that he was too busy.

Biden: US not looking to start ‘cycle of escalation’ with Russia

US Space Command’s mission: ‘Preparing for the war not yet fought’

US Space Command's mission: 'Preparing for the war not yet fought'

the Hill,

18 April, 2021

Militaries are sometimes criticized for planning to fight the last war. The criticism is occasionally warranted, as might be the case in analyzing the efficacy of the World War I-inspired Maginot Line against a World War II-style Blitzkrieg, or planning for anticipated force-on-force set piece battles in Vietnam in the midst of a guerilla war. However, the criticism is often misguided.

No successful military planning occurs without considering what worked well in previous conflicts. Military planners must have a sense of what a potential adversary is thinking, the tactics and strategies they prefer, and what actions might work well against them. Intelligence gives us much of this, but a full sense of these factors in context comes primarily through an understanding gleaned from the last war.

That said, United States Space Command faces a unique dilemma in that we can’t plan for future conflicts based on how we fought previous conflicts even if we were inclined to do so. Rather, we are preparing for the war not yet fought.

Some have suggested Desert Shield/Desert Storm was the first “space war.” To be sure, it was the first major conflict in which space-based capabilities played an integral role, particularly in position, navigation, timing, weather, communications, imagery and tactical missile warning. However, it was not a war which began in space, or a terrestrial war where hostilities extended into space. Such are the wars we must prepare now to deter and, if necessary, to fight and win.

Why do we need to prepare for such a conflict when space has traditionally been a peaceful domain, open to all for exploration, and whose benefits improve the lives of virtually every human being on Earth? As I will soon testify to Congress, the answer is because highly capable competitors realize the extraordinary military and economic advantages that space-based capabilities give to the United States and our allies.

These competitors are determined to deny our advantages in space in favor of their own. China’s space enterprise presents the pacing threat. China is building military space capabilities rapidly, including sensing and communication systems, and numerous anti-satellite weapons. Similarly, Russia’s military doctrine calls for employment of weapons to hold U.S. and allied space assets at risk. Russia has conducted numerous space-based anti-satellite weapons tests. 

Overlay this new strategic reality with the exponential growth in the commercialization of space, and it becomes clear that a once-peaceful operating environment is now competitive, congested and contested. Given our extraordinary reliance on space-based capabilities for virtually every aspect of the modern American and allied way of life — everything from mobile communications and internet connectivity to banking and finance, farming, entertainment and travel — we must protect and defend our interests in the space domain as we do in cyberspace, on land, in the air and at sea. 

This is why, in keeping with the Goldwater-Nichols Act of 1986, the president established a new Combatant Command for space warfighting operations, United States Space Command. It also is why Congress established a new, independent branch of the Armed Forces for space, the United States Space Force, to organize, train and equip those space forces.

Both organizations are singularly focused on their equally critical roles in the mission imperative to protect and defend U.S. and allied interests in space. The current Unified Command Plan is clear in its direction to United States Space Command: We must “conduct offensive and defensive space operations” and “protect and defend U.S. and allied, partner, and commercial space operational capabilities.” The President’s Interim National Security Strategic Guidance further emphasizes the need to “ensure the safety, stability, and security of outer space activities.” We must build the appropriate space architecture along with the associated command and control structures to efficiently and effectively conduct these missions. 

To that end, our first step is to build a team of space operators who outthink and outmaneuver our adversaries, use space combat power to connect the ultimate high ground to the last tactical mile, and preserve U.S. and allied access to the benefits of space.  

My Strategic Vision for United States Space Command provides the formula for how we will win in space. It details how space enables every facet of our way of life, how space makes the superiority of America’s military possible, and how space is the backbone of our global economy. Most significantly, it details a set of key tasks necessary for that victory: Understanding our Competition; Building the Command to Compete and Win; Maintaining Key Relationships; Integrating Commercial and Interagency Organizations, and Maintaining Digital Superiority.

Efforts in pursuit of these key tasks provide the foundation of continued U.S. and allied access to the benefits of space. They give us the roadmap necessary to achieve our ultimate objective of deterring a conflict that begins in or extends into space — the war not yet fought, and the war we aim to win if called upon. They form the basis of our ability to win in the space domain should deterrence fail. The 18,000 military, civilian and contractor personnel supporting United States Space Command’s mission are determined to fulfill these key tasks and meet this new national imperative. I am proud and honored to lead and serve alongside them. 

U.S. Army Gen. James H. Dickinson became commander of the U.S. Space Command in August 2020. He previously served as the first Deputy Commander of U.S. Space Command, the military’s 11th and most recently established unified combatant command, and has held numerous command and staff assignments during his U.S. Army career. He is scheduled to testify Tuesday before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Space Command’s mission and strategic vision.

Royal Navy: US warship joining HMS Queen Elizabeth to ‘defend North Atlantic’ amid Russia tensions

It follows reports two Royal Navy ships would leave the Carrier Strike Group and head to the Black Sea

Plymouth Live,

20 April, 2021

 

A US warship is joining the Royal Navy’s HMS Queen Elizabeth Carrier Strike Group “‘to ensure truly effective deterrence and defence in the North Atlantic” amid escalating tensions with Russia.

It comes as the US ambassador in Moscow heads back to America for “consultations” about “the current state of bilateral relations

The US Navy Press Office said Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) had departed from Mayport yesterday “in Support of British Carrier Task Group 21”. The warship previously linked up with the UK’s flagship in October 2020.

The latest link-up comes after reports that a Royal Navy Type 45 destroyer and Type 23 frigate will leave the HMS Queen Elizabeth Carrier Strike Group and sail for the Black Sea, as tensions continue to rise between Ukrainian and Russian forces.

The UK and other G7 nations had previuosly demanded that Russia ‘ends provocations and de-escalates tensions’ in Ukraine – and US President Joe Biden expelled 10 Russian diplomats and announced a raft of new sanctions in retaliation for alleged hacking and election interference.

Russia then announced it was closing a strait in the Black Sea to foreign warships, including the Royal Navy, for the next six months

It had previously warned America – as two US destroyers headed towards the area – to stay away from the region “for their own good,” reported The Mirror.

And Reuters reported that the United States had cancelled the deployment of the two warships to the Black Sea, according to Turkish diplomatic sources.

The Times then reported that “one Type 45 destroyer armed with anti-aircraft missiles and an anti-submarine Type 23 frigate will peel off from the Royal Navy’s carrier task group in the Mediterranean and head through the Bosphorus into the Black Sea, according to senior naval sources”.

Now the US says that “the inclusion of US. forces” in the UK’s Carrier Strike Group “will improve expeditionary capabilities and interoperability between NATO allies, demonstrating the United States’ commitment to the NATO alliance”.

The Royal Navy’s Commodore Tom Guy, deputy director of Combined Joint Operations from the SeaCentre of Excellence, said: “To ensure truly effective deterrence and defence in the North Atlantic, we need to make sure that the navies of NATO can work as one team, and that means interoperability is vital.

“This NATO vignette has been a great step forward in pursuing allied interoperability. CJOS COE looks forward to continuing to develop this for future deploying Strike Groups.”

US Navy Commander, David Burkett, commanding officer of The Sullivans, said: “It is an honour to sail in this elite multi-national strike group on the frontline demonstrating a fully integrated force that showcases the special relationship that our countries have.

“USS The Sullivans’ namesakes would be extremely proud of us as we boldly show that, We Stick Together!”

HMS Queen Elizabeth (Image: PA)

Meanwhile, US Ambassador to Russia John Sullivan said in a statement that he is returning to the United States this week to discuss US-Russian ties with members of President Joe Biden’s administration.

He emphasised that he would come back to Moscow within weeks.

“I believe it is important for me to speak directly with my new colleagues in the Biden administration in Washington about the current state of bilateral relations between the United States and Russia,” Mr Sullivan said in a statement issued by the embassy.

“Also, I have not seen my family in well over a year, and that is another important reason for me to return home for a visit.”

The Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth will see its first operational deployment next year
The Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth (Image: Gareth Fuller/PA Wire)

Mr Sullivan’s departure comes after Russia on Friday stopped short of asking him to leave the country, but said it “suggested” that he follows the example of the Russian ambassador to Washington, who was recalled for consultations last month after Mr Biden’s description of President Vladimir Putin as a “killer”.

Russia has set no time frame for Anatoly Antonov’s return to Washington.

On Thursday, the Biden administration announced sanctions on Russia for interfering in the 2020 US presidential election and involvement in the SolarWind hack of federal agencies – activities Moscow has denied.

The US ordered 10 Russian diplomats expelled, targeted dozens of companies and people and imposed new curbs on Russia’s ability to borrow money.

Russia denounced the US move as “absolutely unfriendly and unprovoked” and retaliated by ordering 10 US diplomats to leave, blacklisting eight current and former US officials and tightening requirements for the US embassy operations.

While ordering the sanctions, Mr Biden also called for de-escalating tensions and held the door open for co-operation with Russia in certain areas. Russia said it was studying the offer.

“I will return to Moscow in the coming weeks before any meeting between Presidents Biden and Putin,” Mr Sullivan said in Tuesday’s statement

China threatens Taiwan with war over US ties amid another fly-over – ‘Will use force’

CHINA has issued a stark warning to Taiwan, telling the island Beijing prefers war to allowing the country to forge closer ties to the US.

the Express,

20 April, 2021

While Chinese military jets carried out another fly-over above Taiwan, a high-level delegation of US officials visited the island. In response, Beijing told Taipei any attempts to strengthen ties with the US “would fail”.

China’s Taiwan Affairs Office announced the strike force of 25 Chinese fighters, bombers and surveillance aircraft which flew over Taipei was to send a message to the island.

In a grim warning, spokesman Ma Xiaoguang declared: “The signal given by the military drills is that we are determined to stop Taiwan independence, and stop Taiwan from working with the US.

“We are doing it with action.

“We do not promise to abandon the use of force, and retain the option of taking all necessary measures.”

South China Sea: French Navy deploy nuclear-powered attack submarine

An H-6K bomber is seen conducting training exercises, as the People's Liberation Army (PLA) air force conducted a combat air patrol in the South China

China news: Beijing has threatened Taiwan with war if they continue to forge relationships with the US (Image: PA)

Five US-made F16 jets fly over the Presidential Office during Taiwan s National Day in Taipei, Taiwan on October 10, 2020

China news: The Taiwan Affairs Office said ‘we are determined to stop Taiwan independence, and stop Taiwan from working with the US’ (Image: PA)

As the USS Theodore Roosevelt and its battle group entered the South China Sea, China’s aircraft carrier Liaoning and its fleet circled Taiwan.

When the two fleets converged, the 25 Chinese aircraft, which included 14 J-16 strike fighters and four H-6K strategic bombers, pushed their way into airspace over Taiwan’s nearby Pratas Island.

Chinese state media outlet The Global Times said: “The exercise conducted by the PLA (People’s Liberation Army) served as a warning to Taiwan secessionists and the US after the two had made a series of provocative moves.

“The PLA is taking pragmatic steps to make sure it can effectively reunify the island of Taiwan if it comes to that.”

Taiwanese soldiers on a tank at the Hukou military base during the military exercise ahead of next month�s Lunar New Year JANUARY 19 2021

China news: It comes as former US officials visited Taiwan to discuss Beijing (Image: PA)

Express.co.uk graphic of South China Sea

On Wednesday, a former US Senator and two ex-State Department officials arrived in Taiwan to talk with leaders about China.

Chris Dodd, a Democratic senator from Connecticut from 1981 to 2011, was accompanied by two former deputy secretaries of state, James Steinberg and Richard Armitage, to meet with Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen.

A Taiwanese defence official also claimed Taipei wants to buy long-range, air-launched cruise missiles from the US in response to Chinese aggression.

Lee Shih-chiang, head of Taiwan’s defence ministry’s strategic planning department, said Taipei would buy Lockheed Martin Corp’s (LMT.N) AGM-158 weapons system when the US allows.

The AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile can have a range of almost 1,000 km (621 miles) depending on the model.

Express.co.uk graphic on the US' military power

China news: A Taiwanese defence official also claimed Taipei wants to buy long-range, air-launched cruise missiles from the US in response to Chinese aggression (Image: EXPRESS)

Express.co.uk graphic on China's military power

China news: The Australian Defence Force has began preparing for a “worst case scenario” war with Beijing (Image: EXPRESS)

It comes as the Australian Defence Force (ADF) begins preparation for a “worst case scenario” war with China over Taiwan in the next five years.

A diplomatic source told the Australian Financial Review: “There is a lot of development and scenario planning going on.

“It is intended to signal you are not going to blink. It is intended to demonstrate you don’t lack commitment.”

ADF chief Angus Campbell also said conflict over the island of Taiwan would be “disastrous” for the people of the region and should be avoided at all cost.

 

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